new normal

When COVID-19 became a reality, life as we knew it changed. Our routines and ability to predict what would happen next were drastically altered.

Stress and anxiety is a normal reaction to an abnormal situation. We are living in an uncertain time where stress is common. It is nearly impossible to go through one day without hearing alarming information on the news about not only COVID-19 but national security concerns and disasters. We are reminded often that the days are filled with less peace and calm and more destruction and illnesses.

Through all of this, stress and anxiety management has become vital for individuals and families. HOPE is here. We’ve put together some coping skills to practice for minimizing the mental consequences of everything going on in the world and maximizing the recovery of this exposure.

Here’s 8 Tips for Managing Anxiety during the “New Normal”

It’s normal to have difficulty managing your feelings during this time. Because everyone experiences stress and anxiety differently, don’t compare yourself with others around you or judge other people’s reactions and emotions. Here are some tips for coping:

1. Talk about it. By talking with others, trusted friends and family or professionals, about the event, you can relieve stress and realize that others share your experience and feelings.

2. Take care of yourself. Get as much rest and exercise as possible. Try to continue any religious practices or centering activities.

3. Take one thing at a time. Getting things back to normal can seem impossible. Break the job up into doable tasks. Complete that task first and then move on to the next one. Completing each task will give you a sense of accomplishment and make things seem less overwhelming.

4. Help others if you’re able to. Help prepare meals for others. Volunteer to help clean up or rebuild your community. Donate to a local food bank. Helping others can give you a sense of purpose in a situation that feels beyond control.

5. Avoid drugs and excessive drinking. Drugs and alcohol may seem to help you feel better, but in the long run, they generally create additional problems that compound the stress and anxiety you’re already feeling.

6. Ask for help if you need it. If your anxiety is so strong it gets in the way of your daily life, talk with someone. Don’t try to go it alone. This is especially important for people who had existing mental health problems or those who’ve survived past trauma. You could also join a support group. Don’t try to go it alone. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness.

7. Follow public health guidelines from reputable sources. The degree and rate of reopening seems to vary across the country, so stay informed when restrictions are reinstated and up to date. But check the sources as well. There’s a lot of misleading information out there causing more stress and anxiety than needed.

8. Be your own cheerleader and don’t compare yourself to others. Facing your anxiety is hard work. We all have things that scare us or stress us out and because of this, we shouldn’t compare yourself with others. If you are working hard to overcome your anxiety, you deserve to congratulate yourself and be your own cheerleader. The work of re-entering the world after an unprecedented months-long lockdown is work. If you are trying to overcome your anxiety, then you deserve to congratulate yourself for you hard work.

HOPE is Here.

Georgia HOPE specializes in providing quality mental health services for children, adults, individuals and families in the state of Georgia. To learn more, enroll, or refer someone to us, contact us below:

covid blog

COVID-19 as a Trauma/Stress Event

This event has been experienced on a spectrum of “it doesn’t seem like it will impact us” to feeling overwhelmed, frozen or irritated, and not knowing what may happen next.

  • Previous Trauma (i.e. abuse, neglect, violence) can be exacerbated
  • Typical Stressors (i.e. falling behind in school, financial stress/food, regular schoolwork/tests, home stress) can all get worse during the pandemic
  • New Stressors (i.e. wearing a mask, washing hands, worrying about getting sick) surface

How We Might be Feeling Now

We may find ourselves feeling more agitated, easily annoyed or frustrated. Being in lockdown and having a worldwide presence of Covid-19 has left us feeling threatened. We can’t flee the danger so we may be revving up to fight or flat and begin to shut down.

Now things are changing again as we go back to school. Possible feelings for children, teachers and parents about returning to school:

  • Anxious or nervous
  • Afraid of the unknown
  • Reluctant to return
  • Poor sleep
  • Physically not feeing well (tummy or headaches)
  • Poor concentration and distractibility
  • Regression
  • Mood swings

How Can Schools in 2020 Be Trauma Sensitive?

  • There are many things educator, staff, parents and counselors can do to support children who have experienced trauma and help them to cope better at school.
  • Social connectedness – the biggest buffer in times of stress and distress. We can stay physically distant but emotionally close
  • Self-care – helping children learn to do this through modeling and education
  • A safe, predictable, supportive and consistent environment – create this in your environment. You can be the most important contribution for the child’s ability to learn to trust the world again, and enhance their capacity for resiliency
  • Checking in with students when they arrive in your classroom
  • Not expecting “calm” as this would be unrealistic of the children and ourselves. Be realistic about what will be achieved as many of us are in survival mode.
  • Be the thermostat, not the thermometer, for your classroom. Set the tone for your class and not let the class set your tone.

We Need to Put Our Own Oxygen Masks On First

Think of what the flight attendants say on a plane. They remind adult to put their own oxygen masks on before helping children or others around them.

Self-care needs to be a priority. We are no use to those around us if we are “unconscious”

What might self-care look like?

  • Doing an activity you like
  • Taking care of your physical and mental health

Other Ideas

  • Try and find ways to incorporate the whole brain throughout the day (rational thinking, emotions, and decision making)
  • Help regulate yourself and your students by encouraging reading, playing boardgames or learning opportunities
  • Help regulate yourself and your students by creating something or connecting with someone special in your life
  • Help regulate yourself and your students by moving your body around and doing exercise, body breaks or stretching

Ways to Minimize Covid-19’s Imprint in Our Lives

  • Predictability – try to have a routine and things to look forward to
  • Get Moving – feeling trapped increases our fight response
  • Connection – isolation is unnatural for humans. Reach out to friends, family or counselors
  • Numbing Out – often we try to numb out to keep safe, but we need to feel safe for our bodies to heal. Try becoming aware of yourself with loving kindness and compassion
  • Sense of Future – it can feel like this is will last forever. Try breathing or mindfulness to help get a sense of time
  • Sense of Safety – find ways to feel safe again. Listen to music, have private time and reach out if you are unsafe at home

Use of Zones of Regulation

The Zones of Regulation is a framework designed to foster self-regulation and emotional control (Kuypers). It is an effective way of identifying how we are feeling and functioning. It can also be used as a way to check-in with children and ourselves. We need to be in our green zone to in order to learn effectively. It is helpful to identify what we can do to support ourselves depending which zones we find ourselves in.

What are the Zones of Regulation?

Blue Zone (rest area)

  • Sad, sick, tired, board, moving slowly
  • To support myself: talk to your friends and maybe they can cheer you up

Green Zone (go)

  • Happy, calm, feeling okay, focused, ready to learn
  • To support myself: keep having a positive mindset

Yellow Zone (slow)

  • Frustrated, worried, silly/wiggly, excited, loss of some control
  • To support myself: try not to worry and go talk to someone to get it off your chest

Red Zone (stop)

  • Mad/angry, mean, terrified, hitting/yelling, out of control
  • To support myself: walk around or get a drink

For more resources on recognizing and preventing child abuse, neglect and mental health symptoms in a virtual classroom, click here.

If you have questions or would like to enroll in our services or make a referral:

#HOPEisHere

Content Developed by:

  • Christine Clark, MAMFT, LPC, NCC
  • Anna Fortune, LPC, CPCS

Georgia HOPE is currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health for children, adults, individuals and families. If you, your child, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us or call 706-279-0405.

If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

#HOPEisHere

shadow pandemic

Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, anxiety and depression are rising. There are many concerns being raised about what is being called the “shadow pandemic,” a mental health crisis caused from the Coronavirus pandemic.

Nearly half of Americans report the coronavirus crisis is harming their mental health, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll. A federal emergency hotline for people in emotional distress registered a more than 1,000 percent increase in April compared with the same time last year. Last month, roughly 20,000 people texted that hotline, run by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. In the United States, 1 in 5 adults endure the consequences of mental illness each year.

The uncertainty, the isolation, the anxiety, the change to our “normal,” is causing a mental strain on everyone. Increased depression, anxiety, substance use, trauma, suicide, domestic violence, the list goes on. But it doesn’t have to turn into this “shadow pandemic’ because help is here. Just like going to a doctor for a medical health issue, speaking to a licensed professional for a mental health issue is just as important.

Anyone who has had experience with mental illness, personally or professionally, can tell you that despite advances in psychiatry and psychology, a great deal of stigma remains. The stigma associated with mental illness can be divided into two types: social stigma, which involves the prejudiced attitudes others have around mental illness; and self-perceived stigma, which involves an internalized stigma the person with the mental illness suffers from. And both are very real. We have to break the stigma. If you are struggling with mental health issues, you are not alone. If you aren’t struggling with any mental health issues personally, educate people around you about the reality that mental illness is more common than people realize and speak out against stigma. Mental health matters.

stigma

If you’re struggling with anxiety, depression, mental illness, drug and alcohol addictions, or an eating disorder, you don’t have to go through this alone. Georgia HOPE has virtual, online, programs, so that you can get the support you need.

We are currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health. We offer self-pay options as well as insurance coverage.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us to start the first steps or call us at 706-279-0405.

If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

We are all in this together. Stay well! #HOPEisHere

Due to the pandemic, unfortunately some families have lost their insurance, Medicaid or private insurance, due to unemployment and the unpredictable times.

If you have recently lost your insurance, you may qualify for free or low-cost health plans through Georgia’s Medicaid and PeachCare for Kids® programs.

Qualifications:

To find out more visit www.myamerigroup.com/GA to learn how to apply.

Click the download button below for a full list of the state of Georgia resources:

As always, Georgia HOPE is here. Your mental health is just as important to your physical health. We offer integrated care and services for your needs.

Georgia HOPE accepts Medicaid, Amerigroup, Wellcare, Peachstate/Cenpatico, CareSource, DFCS Service Authorizations, and offer very affordable self pay rates.

Contact us today for more information.

#HOPEisHere

online therapy

Just hearing about Teleservices or TeleMental health?  Wondering what it means exactly or how it could impact you and your medical or mental health services? 

Here are some things you may want to know! 

TeleMental Health has been around for decades but has grown exponentially over the past few years.  Now, due to COVID-19, almost every mental health and medical provider has utilized teleservices in some fashion!  Since the virus outbreak, most government regulations have been relaxed, thereby allowing more providers to be trained to offer teleservices for those needing medical and mental health services.  When crisis occurs, mental health and substance use needs do not vanish.  In fact, many see increased feelings of anxiety, stress, isolation and depression. TeleMental Health services is the answer in continuing to reach those in need of these services and connecting with anyone needing continued, or extra support, during these difficult times.  Individuals need to know they are not alone or forgotten. 

A study conducted by the University of Michigan in 2018 found that the most frequent users of teleservices were psychiatrists at 78%, mental health counselors at 33%, social workers at 24%, psychologists at 16% and substance use counselors at 12%.  Teleservices is not a new method of service delivery and research outcomes show that services delivered electronically is just as effective as face to face, traditional delivery. (See studies by the NCBI and Science daily – links below).

You may ask why are we just now relaxing some of these regulations if teleservices are just as effective as traditional forms of therapy?  Great question and so glad you asked! We hope to see increased relaxation on these guidelines post pandemic for the following reasons and more.  

In an article written by Dr. Michael Greiwe the following are important things to consider about teleservices.

TeleMental Health offers:

  • Increased options for service delivery 
  • Increased Access to services.  Miles no longer matter! Travel, gas money, finding a provider close to the client are all barriers to many individuals when seeking services. 
  • Improves client engagement- especially for those in rural areas
  • Reduces overhead and increases revenue for the business 
  • Reduces no shows and cancellations 
  • Improves client satisfaction.  Recently, Georgia HOPE conducted a survey of almost 500 clients.  The survey showed that 95% of clients indicated they were completely satisfied with the teleservices provided by the agency. 

Additionally, teleservices offer support and recovery-focused services virtually from the comfort of the client and provider’s home.  Providers are able to connect with more clients due to decrease in drive time, traffic, office interruptions and the list goes on and on.   

Our mission at Georgia HOPE is to break down barriers, open more doors to accessing services and reach more individuals in need.  TeleMental Health is the answer to many of these initiatives. We were offering teleservices long before COVID-19 and we plan to continue long after. We will be advocating for the expansion of teleservices to all who will hear us. 

If you’re interested in learning more about our TeleMental Health services, contact us today!

#HOPEisHere

Sources:

*Written by Tonya Parrish MA LPC, Georgia HOPE Clinical Director 

mental health

Did you know May is Mental Health Awareness Month? Due to COVID-19, it’s easy to feel a little down. Weddings are postponed, graduation parties are cancelled, smiles are covered by masks, and a hug is frowned upon. Our mental health is at as high of risk as our physical health during this pandemic, so we’re sharing some tips to focus on your mental well-being.

Here are some excellent ways to take care of your mental health this week!

  1. Prioritize your sleep.  Proper sleep helps regulate chemicals in your brain and allows your brain to rest and your immune system to recharge.   You may find it helpful to shut down all electronics an hour before bed, and spend some time reading or listening to music or background noise to wind down.
  2. Eat well. Mineral deficiencies can contribute to low moods.  Several studies show a connection between the Mediterranean approach (which is high in omega-3, vitamin B, vitamin D, healthy fats, and antioxidants) and mental health.  It includes mood boosting foods such as fatty fish rich in Omega 3 (salmon or tuna), nuts (cashews, walnuts, and almonds), legumes, and leafy greens (brussels sprouts, spinach, or kale).
  3. Avoid drugs and excessive use of alcohol. Drugs and alcohol are depressants. Avoid using these substances for your overall mental and physical health and well being.
  4. Get in the sun. Sunlight synthesizes vitamin D, which releases endorphins and serotonin.  Remember the sunscreen and spend 30 minutes outside every day.
  5. Do something you enjoy for no other reason than it makes you feel good. Sing along to the radio, play with your pet, watch a favorite tv show, start on a backyard project. 
  6. Connect with others. Face to face is not always possible, but social distancing is more about physical distance.  Maintaining connection with friends and family is still important to avoid feeling the loneliness and isolation.   Fortunately, we are in a time where we can reach out with FaceTime, Snapchat, a text, or a call.   You could also try sending a card or a letter to let someone know you’re thinking about them.  
  7. Do something for others. Helping others increases your sense of value and sense of community.   While there are some organizations needing volunteers right now, this could also be something as simple as holding the door for someone or giving a compliment.  
  8. Focus on the positive. How you think often affects how you feel.  At this current time many of us feel stressed, anxious and scared.  One way to manage these thoughts is to focus on what you can control – washing your hands, practicing social distancing, avoiding unnecessary trips out.  Try writing something you are grateful for each day.   It could be something overall like family or health, or it could be something specific to that day like your son set the table for dinner or you enjoyed the scented candle you lit.   You could also add one thing you accomplished that day.  These little gratitudes and accomplishments add up over time.  
  9. Activity and exercise.  This does not have to look like working out in the gym or on a Peloton.   Even walking through your neighborhood or in the woods or following along with a yoga video on YouTube can help lower your stress levels and increase endorphins.
  10. Manage your stress. Make a list of the situations that increase your stress response and identify ways that will help you cope when stress and anxiety symptoms escalate.  
  11. Remember to take a break.  If you need to step away from the mess in the kitchen, the work emails, or the online schooling assignment, do it.   Try an easy breathing exercise (take 10 breaths, in for the count of 4, hold for the count of 4, and exhale for the count of 4).  Listen to a favorite song.  Stretch.  If prayer is important to you, make time for it now.  Listen to a short, guided meditation on the phone apps Calm or Headspace.   Just a few minutes away can give you a new perspective for the task at hand.
  12. Laugh and smile.  We’ve heard laughter is good for the soul, but according to several studies, science has shown that smiling can lift your mood, lower stress, lower your blood pressure, and boost your immune system.   So, watch a comedy, check out cute animal videos online, or listen to funny podcasts.  
  13. Ask for help.  If things get to be too much for you, ask for help.   No one has this whole thing figured out.   Ask your partner to wash and fold that load of laundry.   Ask your kids to help with the dinner.   Call a friend and tell them you need to talk.  Ask your boss to prioritize your workload.   

If you’re struggling with a mental health condition, you might feel alone. No one in your inner social circle has dealt with this problem, at least to your knowledge. Is something wrong with me? you might think. Why can’t I just be normal? Should thoughts like these ever pop into your mind, remember: Conditions like these are fairly common, and luckily, it’s easy to treat many of them. Below are a handful of illustrative statistics regarding mental health in America:

1 in 5: This is the number of Americans who experience a mental health problem each year.
9.8 million: This is the number of American adults who have a serious mental health disorder. This translates to roughly one in 25 adults.
6.9%: This is the number of adults with major depression in the U.S.
18.1%: This is the number of adults with anxiety disorders in the U.S.
No. 1: Across the world, depression is the leading cause of disability.
2 to 1: Women are twice as likely to experience major depression as men.

The following are results from the annual Stress in America survey conducted by the APA:

74%: The number of adults who said they had a physical or emotional symptom due to stress in the previous month.
91%: The number of Gen Zers (ages 15 to 21) who said they had a physical or emotional symptom due to stress in the previous month.
1 in 5: The number of adults who don’t feel as though they do enough to manage their stress.
64%: The number of adults who feel stressed by work.
63%: The number of adults who feel stress because of health concerns.
64%: The number of adults who feel stress due to money.
48%: The number of adults who feel stress due to the state of the economy.

Resource: www.success.com  

So remember, if you feel like you’re struggling with some mental health issues – you are not alone. And you shouldn’t have to suffer alone!

If you are currently receiving mental health or substance use services stay the course. Due to COVID-19, the federal government has expanded access to Teletherapy through video chat, Telehealth, and Telephonic appointments.

Georgia HOPE is currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health. If you, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us or call 706-279-0405.

If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

We are all in this together. Stay well! #HOPEisHere

covid19

If the news about the COVID-19 situation has you feeling stressed out, you are not alone. But there are steps you can take to lower your stress, reduce anxiety and help you stay healthy in these uncertain times.

Tips for Coping during COVID-19 and Creating a Sense of Calmness during Times of Anxiety:

Calm Your Body and Mind – When you notice that you are feeling overwhelmed or anxious, try deep breathing or counting your breath down from 10. Practice mindfulness. Turn your thoughts into a bigger perspective view. When a vaccine is found and this has died down, how do you want to have used this time? Focus on the things you can control, like washing your hands and social distancing. Buy food and supplies as normal. Don’t overbuy remembering that others need things too – just get enough for you and your family to get through a few weeks at a time.

Prioritize Self-Care – There are a lot of things you can do to help keep you physically and mentally healthy:

  • Journaling
  • Exercising
  • Healthy Eating
  • Meditating
  • Reading
  • Crafting
  • Listening to music
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Practicing gratitude

Consume a Healthy Dose of Media – Try to minimize your time with the media – just get the facts you need to stay informed and safe. Being connected 24/7 is hard on our mental health. We suggest to just check the news or reputable news outlet websites just once daily.

Reach Out to Others – Share kindness, care, compassion and love with one another whether it is a family member, friend, neighbor or stranger while still practicing social distance. In difficult times like these, using your support network – can be very helpful. Just make sure to reach out to people who are supportive and not those who will increase your stress. And be sure to talk about things other than COVID-19! Jump on a Zoom call with friends and do trivia, FaceTime a family member, mail a card to a distant relative, use this time to stay connected even though a part.

Seek Professional Counseling / Licensed Therapy Services – If you find that anxiety is interfering with your daily functioning or causing increased distress, it’s important to know that you can reach out to a mental health professional. We must learn to overcome the stigma placed on seeking help for mental health issues. Never suffer in silence. There are always options for you, even during social isolation – there’s Teletherapy services available and Teledoc appointments you can make with doctors.

If you live in Georgia, Georgia HOPE is here for you, you can always reach out to us at (706) 279-0405 or https://gahope.org/make-a-referral/rsd-referral/.

alcohol awareness

Georgia HOPE wants to do our part to increase outreach and education regarding the dangers of alcohol use disorders and issues related to alcohol. Our families and communities need to know the resources, information, and options available to address this issue. You can learn more Alcohol Awareness Month here.

Connection is the Opposite of Addiction

Anyone with any association in the substance use world, knows that fact. To learn more about social isolation implications during Covid-19, alcohol.org conducted a survey of 3,000 people working from home across the U.S. to see how this is impacting drinking during the workday. They found that 33% of Georgians surveyed say they’ve had alcohol during the work hours while at home. The national average was 32%. Around one-fifth of people surveyed said they stockpiled alcohol for self-isolation. Here are some other statistics on alcohol use in the U.S.

  • 6 people die every day in the U.S. from alcohol poisoning
  • More than 4,300 people die every year as a result of teenage alcohol use
  • As many as 1.3 million underaged youth engaged in binge drinking within the past month
  • Youth who start drinking before age 15 years are 6 TIMES more likely to develop alcohol dependence or abuse
  • More than 16 million Americans over the age of 18 were living with an alcohol use disorder and about 623,000 young people between the ages of 12 and 17 were struggling as well National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

These are scary statistics. Individuals with problematic drinking behaviors are among the most vulnerable populations right now. Not only does drinking weaken the immune system, studies show that there is a clear relationship between anxiety and alcohol use.

So What Can You Do?

  1. Address the issue before it becomes the problem – talk to your teens
    • Show you disapprove of underage drinking
    • Show you care about your child’s health, wellness and success
    • Show you’re a good source of information about alcohol and other drugs. Here’s a good place to start
    • https://www.shatterproof.org/blog/5-things-know-about-alcohol
    • Show you’re paying attention and will discourage risky behavior
    • Build your child’s skills and strategies for avoiding drinking and drug use
  2. Be an example for your family and friends to show them healthier methods/activities to relieve stress
    • Stretch, take a walk, organize a game night, meditate, get outdoors, make fun mocktails
  3. Take this quiz to better understand your drinking patterns: https://alcoholscreening.org/

Know the Resources

  1. Many programs are offering virtual meetings online
  2. Helpful websites with information and resources
  3. At Georgia HOPE we offer substance use treatment for adolescents and adults in early intervention, relapse prevention and outpatient services including: individual and family therapy, group therapy, skill building, resource linkage, peer support, and co-occurring disorder medication management and treatment. https://gahope.org/.

Crisis Resources

Supporting your Child in Adjusting to a New “Temporary Normal”

The last few weeks for many families have been spent making sure basic needs are acquired, accepting the need to change most plans for an uncertain amount of time, and overall just wrapping minds around our current status. There is a range of feelings regarding school being canceled, parents losing jobs, and the possible illness of family members and friends which make for stressful topics to address with any child who inevitably feels the change in tone from all. These are not topics to avoid though but to address with age appropriate explanation and support. Below are some tips on supporting your child through their uncertainties while coping with your own: 

1. Do not fear talking with your child in an age appropriate manner about Covid-19 and some of the fear around the virus.

By now there are many resources available to aid in doing this. Children are often more perceptive to the feelings and tone of their surroundings than we realize. Ignoring the issue does not eliminate the feelings it creates.  Here are some resources to help in doing this: 

2. Make sure as a parent you are participating in self-care and taking steps to manage your own stress.

Practice the saying “Be a thermostat, not a thermometer” from the Child Parent Relationship Therapy Manual written by Sue Bratton, Gary Landreth, Theresa Kellam, & Sandra Blackard. We want to understand and be with our child during hard times but not let their fear and anxiety during a situation raise ours and vice versa.

3. Practice using Validation when speaking with your child about their fears.

Validation is not confirmation, yet a way to communicate understanding to your child and further connection.  Examples of this may look like, “I could see how you would feel that way.” “I understand how that is hard to think about.” According to Miller, Glinski, Woodberry, Mitchell, and Indik (2002), there are six levels of validation: (https://www.goodtherapy.org/Validation )

  • Listen – ex:“I hear you”
  • Reflection – ex: “ I hear you saying you are really worried about our safety right now” 
  • Empathize – ex: “I understand how you may feel that way with all the changes happening right now.” 
  • Acknowledge Reasons for Behavior – ex: “I understand why it has been hard for you to sleep without answers to your questions.” 
  • Acknowledge Courage- ex: “It takes allot of courage for you to continue trusting that we will all get through this hard time.” 

4. Use this time to create a new schedule that fits your family’s needs.

Children tend to function best, especially in times of uncertainty, with a schedule of things they know they can count on. Mealtimes outlined, learning time, reading time, quiet time and outside time (weather allowing) scheduled for their new routine. Let them know they can count on you to make sure certain these scheduled events happen daily. 

5. Take advantage of the many resources out there to keep the environment fun and light hearted.

These are all resources one may not have been able to take advantage of previously. Below are a few gathered from Georgia HOPE’s Wellness Coordinator, Jana Clift: 

In conclusion, know that we at Georgia HOPE are still here to offer the extra support for parents, children and families that may be needed during this atypical time!! Please do not hesitate to reach out and let us know how we can walk beside you as you navigate your New Temporary Normal.  #HOPEisHere         

Written by: Jennifer Cooper MS, LPC, RPT, NCC