Georgia HOPE is currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health for children, adults, individuals and families. If you, your child, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us or call 706-279-0405.

If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

#HOPEisHere

What is Compassion Fatigue?

Second-hand shock or secondary stress caused by helping others who have suffered trauma or have significant emotional distress. It is often caused by empathy and can imitate symptoms of Post Traumatic stress disorder.

What isn’t Compassion Fatigue?

Fake or made up; “ALL IN YOUR HEAD”

Compassion fatigue is caused by empathy. It is the natural consequence of stress resulting from caring for and helping traumatized or suffering people.

Some other terms you should know…

Vicarious Trauma: Negative transformation in the helper that results from empathic engagement with traumatized individuals, which leads to a reduced sense of spirituality, meaning and hope.

Secondary Traumatic Stress: Individuals become traumatized not by experiencing a traumatic event, but by hearing about it. Can cause symptoms of PTSD including intrusive images, hyper-arousal, distressing emotions, and functional impairment.

Who Experiences Compassion Fatigue?

  • Emergency Workers
  • Nurses
  • Physicians
  • Hospice Staff
  • First Responders
  • Journalists
  • Clergy
  • Social Service Workers
  • Family Members

Who is most at risk? Those who…

  • have a personal history of trauma
  • extend themselves beyond good boundaries of self-care or professional conduct
  • have high caseloads of domestic violence, trauma survivors, sexually/physically abused children
  • have little experience as a social worker
  • have had too much experience as a social worker
  • are experiencing too many negative outcomes

What are symptoms of compassion fatigue?

  • You are falling asleep in meetings, appointments, or sessions.
  • You are dreading an activity you normally enjoy.
  • People keep telling you that you seem “moody”.
  • You cancel appointments more than you keep them.
  • You have a headache….almost daily.
  • There is never enough sleep to be had.
  • Your body aches more than usual.
  • You find yourself becoming emotional with clients, coworkers, or family
    members (empathy turns to sympathy)
  • You hate your job!
  • You are considering that you may not be good at what you do!!

Other symptoms may include:

  • Grief
  • Panic attacks
  • Resentment
  • Memory problems
  • Nightmares
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Apathy
  • Isolation
  • Poor hygiene

Breaking the Cycle

  • Meditate…breathe!!! Deep breathing can promote physical and emotional wellness by decreasing stress and increasing immune system.
  • Creativity is key! Find ways to use your creativity and do something you like. Hobbies can be helpful such as hiking, planting, cooking, or even coloring!
  • Everyone needs to vent! Find a person to vent to that you trust and are comfortable being emotionally vulnerable with.

Addressing Compassion Fatigue

Awareness

  • What types of cases contribute to your stress level increasing your
    vulnerability to compassion fatigue?
  • Take a look at the symptoms of compassion fatigue. Are you aware
    of any of the listed issues or contributing factors in your workday? If
    so, you could be at risk of compassion fatigue.
  • Take a screening inventory: www.proqol.org (Professional quality of
    life information, including compassion fatigue/burnout Professional
    Quality of Life Scale self-test)

Practical Steps: Day to day routines that help break the cycle of
compassion fatigue

  • Sleep adequately…your brain needs a break too. According to studies on Healthguide.org, average adults need 7-9 hours of sleep each night.
  • Eat three balanced meals a day. Balanced nutrition increases energy and levels of concentration.
  • Establish a routine at home and at work and stick with that routine. Consistency helps to create stability.
  • Ask for help when you need it. Express your needs verbally and take positive steps towards changing your environment.
  • Educate yourself on compassion fatigue: http://www.proqol.org/ProQol_Test.html

Keep Balance in Your Life

  • List one mini-escape or diversion that worked well to restore and renew you
  • List one thing that brings you joy
  • Name 3 things you feel grateful for today
  • Think of something that has brought you a sense of joy (Make your top ten list)
  • Who do you love that you can reach out to today? (Call them!)
  • What made you laugh today? (Share it!)
  • Have quiet alone time in a calm, beautiful place- a safe retreat where you feel renewed
  • Have an awareness of what restores and replenishes you.
  • Find ways to acknowledge loss and grief
  • Stay clear with commitment to career goals or your personal mission
  • Know how to focus on what you can control
  • Look at situations as entertaining challenges and opportunities, not problems or stresses

Healthy Boundaries

  • Practicing the art of self-management. “No” is a complete sentence.
  • Developing a healthy support system: people who contribute to your self esteem, people who listen well, people who care
  • Organizing your life so you become proactive as opposed to reactive
  • Reserving your life energy for worthy causes. Choose your battles.
  • Living a balanced life: Sing, dance, sit with silence

Mindfulness and Meditation

  • Developing attention to the present moment and context
  • Attunement – Demonstrating awareness and acceptance of unpleasant or painful emotions, building the capacity to tolerate such emotions in oneself.
  • Egalitarianism – Reminding professionals and staff that they do not hold all of the answers to questions that clients face in the aftermath of a traumatic loss.

Build Connections

  • Talk out your stress- process your thoughts and reactions with someone else (coworker, therapist, clergy, friend, family, supervisor)
  • Build a positive support system that supports you, not fuels your stress
  • Pets accept whatever affection you are able to give them without asking for more. Blood pressure and heart rate decrease when interacting with animals

Don’t give up! You are in the helping profession because you are a helper. Don’t give up on your purpose but find a way to achieve balance. #HOPEisHere

 

June is LGBT awareness month, and we wanted to take the time to highlight the mental health needs of our LGBT community. When referencing LGBT we are referring to a community consisting of individuals identifying as “lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender.” According to the US Institute of Medicine this also refers to a broad coalition of groups that are diverse with respect to gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. It is important as a society to understand the potential mental health struggles of our LGBT community members as awareness is the first step to positive change. 

Here are some quick facts about youth members of our LGBT community: 

  • Transgender youth are much more likely than their non-transgender peers to experience depression – nearly 4x the risk (Reisner 2015 study)
  • LGBTQ teens experience more depression symptoms than their hetero peers (Marshal 2011)
  • In a 2016 – 2017 survey from Human Rights Campaign (HRC), 28% of LGBTQ youth (including 40% of transgender youth) said they felt depressed most or all of the time during the last 30 days.   Compare that to only 12% of non-LGBTQ youth (HRC Foundation 2017)
  • 60% of LGBQ youth reported being so sad or hopeless they stopped doing some of their usual activities (Kann 2016)
  • LGBQ youth are more than TWICE as likely to feel suicidal and over 4x as likely to attempt suicide compared to hetero youth (Kann 2016). According to one study, 1/3 or transgender youth have seriously considered suicide and 1 in 5  has made an attempt  (Reisner 2015)
  • A 2014 study found that LGBQ people who live in communities with more stigmatizing attitudes about their sexual orientation die an average of 12 years earlier than LGBQ people in least-prejudiced communities (Hatzenbuehler 2014)

Although these may be some hard facts to digest, there are several protective factors to be aware of that can increase the possibility of positive outcomes.   Some of these include: 

  • Ensure strong family bonds and increased support from caring adults. It has been documented that youth with affirming families report higher levels of self-esteem. 
  • Environmental support such as (positive school climate – anti-bullying policies) neutral office climates with a concentration on making a safe place for all. 
  • Social support- having the opportunity to connect with others who value diverse beliefs and can exercise empathy and compassion for the experience of another. 
  • Coping strategies- can be a wide range of tools to aid in coping with anxieties, depression and self-doubt should they arise. (mindfulness, meditation, deep breathing). Professional counseling support in gaining some of these tools can be a large asset. 

ANYONE can support another in their use of coping strategies.  Adults who work with members of the LGBT community – counselors, teachers, health professionals – can make it clear that their office is a safe space for youth. 

One of Georgia HOPE’s core values is “Acting for the whole.” We honor individuals of all diversities. We want to emphasize the month of June for our friends who are part of the LGBT community. 

Some further mental health resources to check out: 

  • NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. NAMI encourages LGBTQ people to take care of their mental health and offers help with locating mental health care providers, and tips on how to talk to a therapist.
  • Mental Health America works locally and nationally to raise awareness about mental health and ensures that those at-risk for mental illnesses and related disorders receive proper, timely and effective treatment. MHA offers unique educational materials created specifically for the LGBTQ audience.
  • The Trevor Project is a multimedia support network for LGBTQ youth providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention.
  • The Association of LGBTQ Psychiatrists works within the APA to influence policies relevant to the lesbian and gay community, collaborates with other organizations of gay and lesbian physicians and mental health professionals, and provides referral services for lesbian and gay patients. They offer a list of helpful links to individual and community resources.
  • The Human Rights Campaign is the largest national lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer civil rights organization. They have called for “open, honest discussions about mental health with young people, a key step to reducing stigma and empowering them to seek help and support when needed.”

Want to Talk?

If you’re struggling with any mental health issues, you don’t have to go through this alone. Georgia HOPE has virtual, online programs available for everyone, so that you can get the support that you need. Please contact us here.

We are currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health. We offer self-pay options as well as insurance coverage.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us to start the first steps or call us at 706-279-0405.If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

#HOPEisHere

References:

When traumatization occurs due to experiences of racism it is sometimes referred to as racial trauma. Racial trauma can result from acts and experiences of racism such as workplace discrimination or hate crimes.  It can also be the result of an accumulation of many less overt occurrences, such as, everyday discrimination and micro-aggressions. Regardless of whether these racial acts are overt or not, they are traumatic to the victim of these experiences.

Watching the news right now can be overwhelming for both children and adults. The world can feel like a very unstable and unsafe place.

Understanding how to cope with traumatic racial events is important for mental health and overall wellness.

Understanding how to talk to your family and children about what is going on in the world is important for mental health and overall wellness.

Here’s some resources we’ve put together for both adults and kids:

Resources for Adults & Kids:

Resources for kids that celebrate diversity:

For cultural diversity:

How diversity makes us stronger:

Books with Protagonists of Color

A 2018 study by the School Library Journal showed that 50% of all characters in children’s books were white. 27% were animals. Populating your child’s bookcase with books featuring people of color as protagonists is an important step in combating the narrative of white domination. Here are a few of our favorites!

Preschool

  • The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats. A classic tale of joy and discovery in fresh snow.
  • The Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Pena. Nana shows her grandson the city as they travel by bus.
  • I Am Enough by Grace Byers. The main character celebrates herself in this poetic picture book.

Grades K-2

  • Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall. Jabari is scared to jump from the high diving board. This book helps kids understand how to confront and deal with fear.
  • Princess Hair by Sharee Miller. A beautiful, joyous celebration of all girls’ hairstyles and hair textures.
  • The Katie Woo series by Fran Manushkin. Early rider chapter books featuring a stylish and spunky heroine in relatable adventures.

Grades 3-6

  • The Birchbark House series by Louise Erdich follows an Ojibwe family through Minnesota in the mid-late 1800s.
  • The Season of Styx Malone by Kekla Magoon. A sweet story of friendship and adventure. 
  • Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. A Newberry-Medal winning novel about an orphan’s search for home.

Grades 6 and up

  • Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred D Taylor
  • For Black Girls Like Me by Mariama J. Lockington. A black girl in a white family finds her voice.
  • Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan. An award-winning piece of historical fiction that tells the story of a Mexican migrant farmworker in the 1930s.

Podcasts

  • About Race with Reni Eddo-Lodge  (4.8 stars)
  • The Diversity Gap  (5 stars)
  • What Matters  (5 stars)
  • POD Save the People  (5 stars with 6.7K ratings)
  • You’re Pretty for a Podcast

Apps

  • The Safe Place – on Google play and in the App Store    Minority Mental Health app
  • Liberate Meditation – on Google play and in the App Store   #1 meditation app for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color community

How can Georgia HOPE help? 

If you’re struggling with anxiety, depression, mental illness, drug and alcohol addictions, an eating disorder, or just want to talk to a professional right now with everything going on, you don’t have to go through this alone. Georgia HOPE has virtual, online, programs, so that you can get the support you need.

We are currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health. We offer self-pay options as well as insurance coverage.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us to start the first steps or call us at 706-279-0405.

If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

We are all in this together. Stay well! #HOPEisHere

At Georgia HOPE, our goal every day is to create HOPE for everyone.  In 2015, Georgia HOPE became one of the first behavioral health providers in the nation to be recognized as a Patient-Centered Specialty Practice. This means that we are committed to serving the whole person. When an individual enters services with us, we begin communicating with their primary care provider to ensure that we understand how their mental health may be impacting their physical health, and vice versa. It truly does take a village. #MentalHealthMatters

Whether you’re a current client, new here, school partner, or community partner, we’re thankful to have you here! We HOPE to be able to provide you with the services that you need.

What Services Are Available?

TeleTherapy allows us to provide individual or family therapy services through a HIPAA compliant online platform in any private setting. Anywhere that you can access the internet, you can access our teletherapy services.

  • Mental Health Assessment
  • Substance Abuse Assessment
  • Individual & Family Counseling
  • Drug and Alcohol Addiction Counseling and Recovery Services
  • Eating Disorder Counseling
  • Anxiety and Depression Counseling
  • Postpartum Depression Counseling
  • Group Counseling
  • Psychiatric and Nurse Services
  • Peer Support Services
  • Psychiatric Assessments
  • Medication Evaluation & Management
  • Case Management
  • Skill Building/CSI
  • Resource Linkage
  • Parent Skills Training

Community Groups / Group Therapy allows us to offer community groups / group therapy through a HIPAA compliant secure online platform.

  • Adult Groups: For example- Women’s Prenatal & Postpartum, Health Relationships, Wellness Skills & Life Skills, and More
  • Children Groups: For Example – Self Esteem Building for Teen Girls, Anger Management, Emotional & Social Skills, and More
  • For the full list, click here.

Who Can Get Services at Georgia HOPE or Refer Others to Services?

Individuals and Families

Georgia HOPE offers mental health, substance use, and recovery services for:

  • Adults
  • Children
  • Teens
  • Couples
  • Families

Community Partners

Georgia HOPE works with community partners to connect others to mental health, substance use or family preservation services.

  • Mental Health Assessment
  • Substance Abuse Assessment
  • Individual & Family Counseling
  • Group Counseling
  • Psychiatric and Nurse Services
  • Peer Support Services
  • Psychiatric Assessments
  • Medication Evaluation & Management
  • Case Management
  • Skill Building/CSI
  • Resource Linkage
  • Parent Skills Training

School Partners

Georgia HOPE works with schools in the state of Georgia to connect school families and parents, staff, teachers, and students to mental health, substance use or family preservation services.

  • Diagnostic Assessment
  • Community Support & Resource Linkage
  • 24/7 Crisis Protocol & Support
  • Individual & Family Therapy
  • Family Training
  • Group Therapy & Training
  • Client Support Services
  • Psychiatric Care
  • Nursing Services
  • Medication Management
  • Case Management
  • Assistance with Obtaining Medicaid
  • Consultation with Teachers
  • Classroom Observation
  • Universal Prevention Initiatives
  • School & County Wide Trainings
  • Camp HOPE!

How Can You Pay for Services at Georgia HOPE?

We accept Medicaid, Amerigroup, Wellcare, Peachstate/Cenpatico, CareSource, DFCS Service Authorizations, and offer very affordable self pay rates.

What Are the Next Steps?

For more information, to take the next steps or to speak to someone directly, contact us here.

shadow pandemic

Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, anxiety and depression are rising. There are many concerns being raised about what is being called the “shadow pandemic,” a mental health crisis caused from the Coronavirus pandemic.

Nearly half of Americans report the coronavirus crisis is harming their mental health, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll. A federal emergency hotline for people in emotional distress registered a more than 1,000 percent increase in April compared with the same time last year. Last month, roughly 20,000 people texted that hotline, run by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. In the United States, 1 in 5 adults endure the consequences of mental illness each year.

The uncertainty, the isolation, the anxiety, the change to our “normal,” is causing a mental strain on everyone. Increased depression, anxiety, substance use, trauma, suicide, domestic violence, the list goes on. But it doesn’t have to turn into this “shadow pandemic’ because help is here. Just like going to a doctor for a medical health issue, speaking to a licensed professional for a mental health issue is just as important.

Anyone who has had experience with mental illness, personally or professionally, can tell you that despite advances in psychiatry and psychology, a great deal of stigma remains. The stigma associated with mental illness can be divided into two types: social stigma, which involves the prejudiced attitudes others have around mental illness; and self-perceived stigma, which involves an internalized stigma the person with the mental illness suffers from. And both are very real. We have to break the stigma. If you are struggling with mental health issues, you are not alone. If you aren’t struggling with any mental health issues personally, educate people around you about the reality that mental illness is more common than people realize and speak out against stigma. Mental health matters.

stigma

If you’re struggling with anxiety, depression, mental illness, drug and alcohol addictions, or an eating disorder, you don’t have to go through this alone. Georgia HOPE has virtual, online, programs, so that you can get the support you need.

We are currently providing Mental Health and Substance Use services throughout the state of Georgia via TeleMental Health. We offer self-pay options as well as insurance coverage.

If you, or someone you know, are interested in services, you can submit a referral online to us to start the first steps or call us at 706-279-0405.

If you’re interested in learning more about our services, please contact us here.

We are all in this together. Stay well! #HOPEisHere

Due to the pandemic, unfortunately some families have lost their insurance, Medicaid or private insurance, due to unemployment and the unpredictable times.

If you have recently lost your insurance, you may qualify for free or low-cost health plans through Georgia’s Medicaid and PeachCare for Kids® programs.

Qualifications:

To find out more visit www.myamerigroup.com/GA to learn how to apply.

Click the download button below for a full list of the state of Georgia resources:

As always, Georgia HOPE is here. Your mental health is just as important to your physical health. We offer integrated care and services for your needs.

Georgia HOPE accepts Medicaid, Amerigroup, Wellcare, Peachstate/Cenpatico, CareSource, DFCS Service Authorizations, and offer very affordable self pay rates.

Contact us today for more information.

#HOPEisHere

What Is a Traumatic Event?

A traumatic event is a scary, dangerous, or violent event that possess a threat to a child’s life. Witnessing a traumatic event that threatens life or physical security of a loved one can also be traumatic. This is particularly important for young children as their sense of safety depends on the perceived safety of those around them.

Traumatic experiences can bring out strong emotions and physical reactions that can persist long after the event. Children may feel scared, helpless or overwhelmed.

Even though adults work hard to keep children safe, dangerous events still happen. This danger can come from outside of the family (such as a natural disaster, car accident, school shooting, or community violence) or from within the family, such as domestic violence, physical or sexual abuse, or the unexpected death of a loved one.

What Experiences Might Be Traumatic?

  • Bullying
  • Family or community violence
  • Physical, sexual, or psychological abuse and neglect
  • Natural and technological disasters
  • Sudden or violent loss of a loved one
  • Serious accidents or life-threatening illness
  • Military family-related stressors (e.g., deployment, parental loss or injury)

Prevalence of Traumatic Exposure & Symptoms

In a nationally representative survey of 12- to 17-year-old youth, 8 percent reported a lifetime prevalence of sexual assault, 17 percent reported physical assault, and 39 percent reported witnessing violence. Among 536 elementary and middle school children surveyed in an inner city community, 30 percent had witnessed a stabbing and 26 percent had witnessed a shooting Among middle and junior high school students in an urban school system, 41 percent reported witnessing a stabbing or shooting in the past year. (source)

In a community sample of older adolescents, 14.5 percent of those who had experienced a serious trauma developed PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). A recent review of research on children exposed to specific traumas found wide ranges in rates of PTSD: 20 percent to 63 percent in survivors of child maltreatment, 12 percent to 53 percent in the medically ill. 5 percent to 95 percent in disaster survivors. Based upon data from a variety of sources, a conservative annual cost of child abuse and neglect is an estimated $103.8 billion, or $284.3 million per day (in 2007 values). http://www.nctsn.org/resources/topics/facts-and-figures https://www.nctsn.org/sites/default/files/resources//impact_of_complex_trauma.pdf

Things to look for with traumatized kids:

  • Anxiety, fear & worry about safety and others
  • Changes in behavior
  • Discomfort with or avoiding feelings
  • Trouble with trust and perceptions of others
  • Over- or under-reacting to bells, physical contact, doors slamming,
  • sirens, sudden movements
  • Repetitive thoughts and comments about death or dying
  • Heightened difficulty with authority, redirection, or criticism

Things to Remember with Traumatized Kids :

  • Be aware of BOTH those youth who act out AND those who are quiet.
  • Anniversaries of the event or media reports may act as reminders to
    the adolescent, causing a recurrence of symptoms, feelings, and
    behaviors.

The Importance of Relationships:

“Trauma and our response to it cannot be understood outside the context of human relationships. Whether people have survived an earthquake or have been repeatedly sexually abused, what matters most is how those experiences affect their relationships – to their loved ones, to themselves and to the world….As a result, recovery from trauma and neglect is also all about relationships – rebuilding trust, regaining confidence, returning to a sense of security and reconnecting to love….Healing and recovery are impossible – even with the best
medications and therapy in the world – without lasting, caring connections to others.” – Bruce Perry (The Boy Who was Raised as a Dog, pp. 231-232, emphasis added)

Things to Remember:

  • Healing from trauma is best done in the context of relationships.
  • So the best thing you can do is to be there, listen, and support them.
  • Take care of yourself!
  • If you notice that you feel overwhelmed or triggered by what you’re hearing,
    ask for help!
  • Don’t try to do it all on your own.
  • Referrals to professionals can be helpful supplements to the relationships you
    have with these youth.
  • Take a break!

What Resources Are Available?

Trauma is real but it doesn’t have to secure a child’s fate.

Resources available in Georgia

  • Community-based counseling
    • Community Service Boards (CSB)
    • Private Providers (i.e. Georgia HOPE)
    • Care Management Entities (CME)
    • Types: CORE, DFCS-contracted, IFI, wrap-around
  • Private Practice Providers
  • Child Advocacy Centers
  • Psychiatrists, Nurse Practitioners
  • Medical Doctors (Pediatricians)

Example of Community Interventions – Special Programs at Georgia HOPE:

Types of Services

  • Individual Counseling
  • Family Counseling
  • Group Counseling
  • Individual Skills-building (i.e., CSI)
  • Parent Training
  • Medication Management
  • Certified Peer Specialist (CPS)

Great Resources Available to You:

Georgia HOPE is here for you and your family during, always. Whether it’s providing tips through our blog and social media channels or online family therapy. If there is anything we can do to help you and your family, please feel free to reach out to us! HOPE is here.

prevention week

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Prevention Week (NPW) is a public education platform that promotes prevention year-round through providing ideas, capacity building, tools, and resources to help individuals and communities make substance use prevention happen every day. This year National Prevention Week is May 10 – 16, 2020.

What topics does NPW address?

Each year, NPW incorporates daily health themes to focus on pressing substance use topics. The 2020 daily health themes are:
• Monday, May 11: Preventing Prescription Drug and Opioid Misuse
• Tuesday, May 12: Preventing Underage Drinking and Alcohol Misuse
• Wednesday, May 13: Preventing Illicit Drug Use and Youth Marijuana Use
• Thursday, May 14: Preventing Youth Tobacco Use (E-cigarettes and Vaping)
• Friday, May 15: Preventing Suicide

NPW Prevention Challenge: #PreventionHappensHere

Take the Challenge in Three Easy Steps

  1. Download and fill out your #PreventionHappensHere sign.
  2. Take a selfie with your sign in the place where prevention happens in your life.
  3. Post your selfie on social media with the #PreventionHappensHere #NPW2020 hashtag and tag your location and your friends.

If you aren’t able to print the #PreventionHappenHere sign, that’s OK! Just follow steps two and three to share your prevention selfie and answer the sign questions below in your post caption.

PREVENTION HAPPENS IN ___________________
SHARE YOUR CITY, STATE, REGION, OR LOCATION
I’M PREVENTING ______________________
SHARE SPECIFIC SUBSTANCE MISUSE ISSUE(S) YOU’RE PREVENTING.

Prevention Happens Anywhere and Everywhere

Substance misuse prevention happens in a lot of places and communities. That’s why NPW is challenging you to take a selfie in the locations and environments where you are preventing substance misuse and suicide. Your selfie can be by yourself or with a group of people. Just show us where prevention happens in your life!

Need some ideas? Here’s some from NPW. Prevention happens:

  • When you decide to take your dog for a walk instead of going to a big party with illegal substance use
  • When two people discuss their mental health in their living room via FaceTime

For more information on NPW, check out their website here.

Looking for resources on Prescription drugs, Heroin, Marijuana, and Underage Drinking? Check out this course: http://www.georgiapreventionproject.org/resources/substance-abuse.php

Georgia HOPE is a supporter of SAMHSA National Prevention Week

We are here as a local resource in Georgia to help individuals, families and communities make substance use and suicide prevention happen every day. You don’t have to suffer alone. #HOPEisHere

If you’re interested in speaking to someone directly at Georgia HOPE about substance use recovery or mental health services, contact us today by clicking here.

online therapy

Just hearing about Teleservices or TeleMental health?  Wondering what it means exactly or how it could impact you and your medical or mental health services? 

Here are some things you may want to know! 

TeleMental Health has been around for decades but has grown exponentially over the past few years.  Now, due to COVID-19, almost every mental health and medical provider has utilized teleservices in some fashion!  Since the virus outbreak, most government regulations have been relaxed, thereby allowing more providers to be trained to offer teleservices for those needing medical and mental health services.  When crisis occurs, mental health and substance use needs do not vanish.  In fact, many see increased feelings of anxiety, stress, isolation and depression. TeleMental Health services is the answer in continuing to reach those in need of these services and connecting with anyone needing continued, or extra support, during these difficult times.  Individuals need to know they are not alone or forgotten. 

A study conducted by the University of Michigan in 2018 found that the most frequent users of teleservices were psychiatrists at 78%, mental health counselors at 33%, social workers at 24%, psychologists at 16% and substance use counselors at 12%.  Teleservices is not a new method of service delivery and research outcomes show that services delivered electronically is just as effective as face to face, traditional delivery. (See studies by the NCBI and Science daily – links below).

You may ask why are we just now relaxing some of these regulations if teleservices are just as effective as traditional forms of therapy?  Great question and so glad you asked! We hope to see increased relaxation on these guidelines post pandemic for the following reasons and more.  

In an article written by Dr. Michael Greiwe the following are important things to consider about teleservices.

TeleMental Health offers:

  • Increased options for service delivery 
  • Increased Access to services.  Miles no longer matter! Travel, gas money, finding a provider close to the client are all barriers to many individuals when seeking services. 
  • Improves client engagement- especially for those in rural areas
  • Reduces overhead and increases revenue for the business 
  • Reduces no shows and cancellations 
  • Improves client satisfaction.  Recently, Georgia HOPE conducted a survey of almost 500 clients.  The survey showed that 95% of clients indicated they were completely satisfied with the teleservices provided by the agency. 

Additionally, teleservices offer support and recovery-focused services virtually from the comfort of the client and provider’s home.  Providers are able to connect with more clients due to decrease in drive time, traffic, office interruptions and the list goes on and on.   

Our mission at Georgia HOPE is to break down barriers, open more doors to accessing services and reach more individuals in need.  TeleMental Health is the answer to many of these initiatives. We were offering teleservices long before COVID-19 and we plan to continue long after. We will be advocating for the expansion of teleservices to all who will hear us. 

If you’re interested in learning more about our TeleMental Health services, contact us today!

#HOPEisHere

Sources:

*Written by Tonya Parrish MA LPC, Georgia HOPE Clinical Director